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, but it seemed to me whenever nixon said, kennedy just looked at him and smirked. which played into kennedy's hands. he did have the indian side on that nixon. nixon gave him a poor family. he was clumsy. and he was defending an administration that he is not only in support of. >> what is the first thing you want to see as the debate began? >> that is an interesting question. i think maybe what i want to see is nothing. and maybe for the first time i will turn the tv on, walk into the other room and listen. and see what can be cleaned by focusing on what is being said, -- what can be gleaned by focusing on what is being said. >> we can stand by them. but that goes to the radio point of people who are listening to nixon on radio. >> i am listening for things that are said by the candidates, and especially things that i can then go back and verify after. to listen for claims, for arguments that i can go back and say, is this something that is real, that is credible? and then look out for other information that either verifies or --. >> i want to make a comment on the appearance of thing. that
to the 1960 debate between richard nixon and john kennedy as the first impression that each candidate made to the voters. in 2000, same thing between al gore. the split screen showing him signing to the responses of george w. bush. >> one of the things both campaigns talk about is this is a possible advantage for governor romney because there is an elevated factor for him. he is on the same stage as the president. these debates to make an impression. sometimes they have a lasting impression. often, they do not. it is an opportunity, one of the few moments in the campaign, the conventions are another, but this is the last opportunity that both candidates have to speak to such a large audience at once. >> laura meckler, thank you for being with us. we have warren decker. he is from a university in fairfax, virginia. joining us from boston, a professor alan schroeder. he has 50 years of high risk tv. what makes a good debate and a good debater? >> i think the difference between a really good debate from my standpoint, intercollegiate debate, and debates we see at the presidential level is tha
-deportation for illegal immigrants. >>> let me fin wish a behind the scene looks in what happened in the great kennedy/nixon debates. i've got it for you. this is "hardball," the place for politics. >>> ron brown's in "the national journal" wrote, the main reason obama is doing better in battleground states has to do with his increase from white working women. working class women. keep in mind, back in 2008, nationally, obama only got 41% of that group's vote. well, today in michigan 46% say they support the president. in florida it's 48%. nevada, new hampshire, wisconsin, and pennsylvania, the number hovers in those cases around 50%. in ohio and iowa, it's up to 52%. looking good for the president with white working class women. what an interesting category to be moving ahead in. we'll be right back. >>> welcome back to "hardball." today we saw a blow to the nationwide republican effort to suppress democratic turnout. a pennsylvania judge blocked a strict voter photo i.d. requirement from going into effect before election day. judge robert simpson wrote in part, i am not still -- i am not still convinced t
. really from 1858 until 1960, john f. kennedy versus richard nixon, debates didn't play that big a role in presidential campaigns. there were no presidential debates. but you did have in primaries occasionally, squareoffs going on. interesting to even think about stats from minnesota rarely run for president -- stacken ran for president every four years. kennedy/nixon was the game changer in debate history. people that listened to it thought nixon won on radio but on television, john f. kennedy won. nobody was that happy with the debates. we had no debates in '64 '68 '72. came back in 1976 when jimmy carter ended up doing well because of gerald ford's famous gaffe. that's the big question. can you become gaffe-free? everybody is going to be looking wednesday night to see if there was a mistake made by either person. it puts a lot of pressure on the candidates. >> jennifer: you mention nixon and kennedy and those who saw the debate felt like kennedy won. what do you think is more important? what the candida
was in black and white in 1960. it was argued that john f. kennedy had shown richard nixon mainly because of the way he looked on screen. do these debates boil down to style over substance? we're joined by brian callahan who coaches government and industry leaders in public speaking. how much do looks matter in this? if nixon had sweated less in that clip that we just saw, would he have done better? >> i think he would have. particularly since it was the dawn of television and people were getting visual cues for the first time. when senator kennedy looked much more comfortable than nixon, that played very much to his advantage. >> well, let's take a look at the presidential debate now in 1984. ronald reagan was asked if he was too old to be president. >> i want you to know that i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i'm not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. [laughter] >> that is also one of my favorite lines. >> that is my favorite as well. >> it is pretty good. it tells us nothing about policy but it made us laugh. >> it tells us that h
for better u.s.-china relationships. now, the open china you and president nixon made in early 1970's, was not only a turning point in history, but also it has changed our lives, for millions of people, chinese, chinese americans, and americans. thank you very much, doctor kissinger. [applause] now, one of the things you have taught us is to better understand chinese politics, or how to develop a broader vision. we have to have a deeper understanding of chinese politics, society, behaviors, political systems. let me come to the question you raised. i am disappointed, not what the leadership, but rather disappointed with the social media. it is fair to say that the chinese government said several times in a press conference and to foreign delegates that vice- president shi was injured in his back. i think that is enough. more importantly, i was interviewed many times by the media. i say i do not want to comment. there is nothing happening. they would cancel their trip. the police and the military would react unusual. there is no sign whatsoever. it seems like it is very odd that the ch
the first-ever televised debate richard nixon chose to wear no makeup. with a 5:00 shadow he looked sweaty and uncomfortable compared to the tanned, relaxed john f. kennedy. then voters heard the impatient sighs of al gore. it was clear by the microphones while george w. bush was talking. it played into a larger narrative into the campaigns. it re-inforced what the audience thought about the candidates. >> when gore sighed endlessly and moaned during the debate and we saw that on television, it just emphasized the idea that he was arrogant and condescending, something people were already concerned about. when nixon was sweating, there was some sense that he was already shifty and there was an anxiety in his soul as well as his body. >> that's what the question in this campaign is about. >> reporter: in a later debate that year gore appeared to invade the personal space of bush. >> i believe i can. >> reporter: a move which made him look awkward compared to his relaxed opponent. in 1992 george h.w. bush was caught twice by cameras glancing at his watch during a town hall debate with voters
were seen as pivotal in affecting the outcome. that was 1960, where the jfk-richard nixon debates where richard nixon appeared sweaty and uncomfortable and then 2000 where al gore was seen as sighing and sort of dismissive of then texas governor george bush. so when you asked jen and barbara whether they were giving their candidates advice on things that are aesthetic, they should be. >> that's what we all remember, right, do you wear the gray suit on black and white tv, nixon. let me ask this, because you've done a lot of work on this. super pacs and the candidates are competing for money, which a lot of people might not realize. but the campaign can cover whatever it wants with the money, the super pac not linked to the campaign at all so not ideal for the campaign. the romney campaign, $86 million raised. the pro romney super pac, $41 million. and american crossroads, affiliate with karl rove, $58.7 million. so you can add that up and get a big number or say if karl rove doesn't like how mitt romney does tomorrow night, he could give a lot of that $60 million, the biggest chunk of ch
nixon declared, he wanted to criminalize but also treat a lot of addicts. we have gone away from the treatment model all together. why did we lose sight of that being part of the whole model? >> easy politics to say you are tough on crime. nixon discovered that in '68 he made crime a national issue. the funny thing about nixon, he deserves credit on the ground how he dealt with adikts. he dealt with a drug problem in a way where two-thirds of his drug budget were spent on treatment, only a third on interdiction and law enforcement. he knew personally and practically from experience that treatment was the way to go yet he also knew on the campaign trail that doesn't sell. i will protect from you the evil ers do down the block, i will protect you from this scourge in american life that got him like theed in a landslide in '72, now politics have followed suit ever since, reagan, clinton, both parties agree on one thing, saying you are not tough on crime has been political suicide. i believe it is changing but it has been till now political suicide. >> well, you were just telling us
del primer debate presidencial, millones de personas vieron el debate de kennedy y nixon, la imagen fresca de ♪. >>> el gobierno de los estados unidos comenzó un nuevo programa piloto de deportación aérae, el plan es realizar dos vuelos desde el paso texas a ciudad de méxico, estas no son deportaciones voluntarias. >>> por tercera vez los asientos de un avión american airlines se sueltan en pleno vuelo, la empresa ha dicho que personal técnico examina las causas posibles. >>> se demandó a jp morgan chase por presunto fraude, de ben sterns la cual compró jp morgan a un precio muy bajo en el momento de la crisis >>> los expertos calculan que el primer debate presidencial entre los candidatos el presidente barack obama y mitt romney podría ser el más visto de la historia, luis megid en denver nos dice qué significado tiene ese estado para las campañas. >>> tradicionalmente un bastión republicano y el éxodo del campo a las ciudades, ha hecho colorado un lugar que todo es posible, hace 4 años colorado votó por le presidente barack obama, este año las encuestas están c
announcer ] humana. lou: joining us now katie microlending holding the post under nixon ford and reagan. start with "the washington post" getting the next round of sensitive documents lying on the floor in the consulate of benghazi this is outrageous. >> three weeks later we cannot send in the fbi it is too dangerous but the reporters are picking up sensitive documents talking about the people in libya. three weeks later. lou: not securing a because we have no personnel i know people in the fbi and i have the highest respect one of my oldest friends is there. the idea they make them look like in the tent and even want to continue the description to make them look horrible. >> it was either a massive intelligence failure to not know the was a security threat to and if not then a massive security failure to not protect them. either way it is now a cover up. remember the youtube movie? they said the intelligence community said it was there fault. lou: one of the where does things i have never seen comes out with the statement on a friday and has not appeared in public he could be in a rive
. and the experienced vice president richard nixon seemed uncomfortable, even sweaty. as the debate's producer, the late don hewitt, remembered. >> i looked at him on camera and i thought, oh, my god, this is trouble. >> reporter: the first lesson: the debates would not just be about what you said but how you looked when you said it. and mistakes could have huge consequences. in 1976 at the height of the cold war, president gerald ford mysteriously declared -- >> there is no soviet domination of eastern europe. >> reporter: he lost to jimmy carter. but in 1984, another incumbent, ronald reagan, used the debates to diffuse criticism of his advancing age. >> you already are the oldest president in history. >> reporter: he was 73 at the time. >> i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. (laughter) >> "i was smiling" watt walter mondale later said "but i knew he'd gotten me there." other lessons, it may be best not to start your opening statement this way. >> who am i? why am i here? >> reporter: as admiral james stockdale, ross pro's running mate did, in 1992. d
. al gore huffed and puffed to defeat and nixon sweated a. the debates are as much as what you want versus i you present it. and just to show you have enough to get elected. president of
back to richard nixon's wedding in the kennedy debate. peter barnes. thank you so much. neil cavuto will be leading coverage from denver on fox business at 8:00 eastern. a host of guests including former debt commission co-chair alan simpson, former alaska governor sarah palin peterson thome tivo co-founder bernie markus and martin o'malley, chairman of the democratic governors' association. join us at 8:00 p.m. for neil's coverage. the closing bell will ring in 49 minutes. general electric invested $20 million in project fraud. the company pre built energy-efficient structures. we will talk to the ceo of project fraud about how she is building her way to the top and why she thinks her company could be the next apple. stuart: netflix is the power mover of the hour with shares jumping 9%. let's look at this charge up to $61.69, $5 for the day. citigroup reiterating its buy rating on this company noting this is the first time since last summer that customer satisfaction has started to improve. netflix struggles since hiking prices and trying to split its dvd service but looking good u
answers but look the part. jfk did since nixon just got out of the hospital. number one. i have as much experience as jack kennedy did. >> i served with jack kennedy. he was a friend of mine. senator, you are no jack kennedy. [cheers and applause] gerri: the offer quoted exchange he much waited for kennedy name to come up. i will rehearse line. those who have forgotten about obamacare the fiercest opponent florida attorney general will join me next. ♪ you see us, at the start of the day. on tyou see us bank onist that's abusier highways.r. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. gerri: two hours and counting until the presidential debate. the key issue is obamacare romney says he will repeal and replace his first day in office. florida attorney general pam bondi. you have been the most effective voice to call for the repeal. what do expect to hear?
that ted rogers put there for nixon and he said, don't let anybody change this. i said, get out of the way or i'm going to call the police. he immediately left and i changed the air conditioning back to normal. wilson understand the game and how it was going to be played. the candidates had their jobs to do, so did their handlers. he said his opponent, he said, he wanted to keep his job because of the screw-up that happened in the first debate. this is what goes on in politics. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. >>> tomorrow i'll be in denver. we'll have live editions of "hardball" at 5:00 and 7:00 eastern. and complete coverage of the debate with my msnbc colleagues at 8:00. "the ed show" starts right now. >>> good evening, americans. welcome to "the ed show." 25 hours before the first presidential debate and 35 days until the 2012 election. mitt romney and paul ryan are scrambling. robert gibbs is here tonight to respond. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >>> you can use your charitable deduction or home mortgage deduction and can fill a that bucket,
president richard nixon had recently gotten over a bout with an infection that left him looking shaky. kennedy looked healthy and strong. when kennedy won nearly half said the debate played a role in the decision. al gore was criticized for sighing and rolling his eyes while debating george bush in 2000. and then capped it off with this moment. >> it is not what your philosophy and position on issues but can you get things done. and i believe i can. >> that's funny. i'm sorry. you hear this next one repeated many times. it came from ronald reagan during his debate with jimmy carter. reagan posed a simple question. >> are you better off than you were four years ago? >> four years later president reagan was 73 facing concerns about his age, an issue compounded by his shaky first debate and then turned the weakness into a strength with this line. >> i want you to know that also i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> bill clinton was on the other side of that equation while debating another 7
of the heroism of the bystanders in portland, maine. urs la nixon broke her leg after she crashed her car into the harbor. several people you see in the pictures there they jumped into the water as the car slowly sank below the surface. nix nixon's family says she faces weeks of recovery but she's grateful to her rescuers. looked like about five people or so there, wolf, jumped in that water. i'm sure that water wasn't very warm either talking portland, maine. >> they saved her. good for them, good for her. >>> gloria borger sat down with ann romney. but first, our unsolicited advice panel is standing by. they're going to preview some key questions you're going to want to listen for in tonight's debate. [ female announcer ] what does the anti-aging power of olay total effects plus the skin perfecting color of a bb cream equal? introducing the newest trend in beauty. olay total effects cc cream. c for color. c for correction. [ female announcer ] fight 7 signs of aging with a flawlessly beautiful complexion instantly. we call it a phenomenon. you'll call it possibly the most exciting skin
the first televised pressdentialdebate... between kennedd and nixon. (veey wide) "it will be interesting in the debates to see..." bradley has this aavise for the candidates :(on romnee)"i would really ork with mitt romney on breathing.. and becoming more grounded in his body so he actually takes a stand and doess't do that shifting"(on obama)"i woull work itt barrack obama i wouud continue to work with hii oo taking a stance beiig more grounded more clear and more specific, he has a strange phrasing sometimes where he stops nd takks ssrange pauses.. " voters can perceive a politicians physical movements in a posstive.. or negative wayy.. depending on the viewpoint they ay already have on the cannidate. (professor)"so what areeyou going to hoose to act on.. how will you vote."in college park.. mdkc fox 45 &pnews at 10 the presidential debate is taking place tomorrow night in denver. ...new polls show that the race between obamm and rrmney...could end in a tie. read about the possible fox-baltimore dot com...click onnvote 2012 in the hot topics section at the top offthe screen 3 3
, it happened. kennedy, nixon. >> i got $5. >> the rest of us got a tradition. an evolving tradition praised and criticized over the last 52 years. >> what about you? do you think debates are good now or bad? >> i don't know. mr. cann is a good reminder, often the americans who make democracy better are the americans who don't take democracy for granted. gary, 9news. >> i give the debates two thumbs up. i think it's important to know what our candidates think and put them on the spot here. now tonight, i am here at u.s.a. today's newsroom where our live coverage gins tonight at 9:00. you can catch the debate on our website. of course you can join us for a wrap up of the debate tonight at 11:00. and topper shutt has the story on what the weather is looking like out there. top. >> first of all, talk about fall colors. we're looking at near peek as you go on the other side of the divide past cumberland, over toward oakland. some good color showing toward i-81. wait a couple of weeks. some color, but south and east, no color at all. all right, next three days, code green, getting better an b
was the case. john kennedy against nixon was the case. you can argue in 2000 with bush and gore. some of these debates turn more on style than substance. the economy is front and center tonight. that is an area mitt romney feels he's got the ammunition. he's got the data. the concern among some of the romney supporters is he doesn't walk out on the data. he's got it down cold. the criticism is he hasn't brought passion to the argument and he's the guy to lead the change. expect him to throttle on the weakness of this recovery. expect the president to come back and show with the latest jobs figures and others that has been moving in the right direction, that the trend is his friend. they're each going to look at the same thing, selling it differently. >> are there some concerns in the president's camp, similar concerns to those in the romney camp? because the president, though he brings passion, he can be wonky and goes on with the answers. >> reporter: who am i to judge people on being dull? there is a concern that boeing of these guys -- the president is a gifted, eloquent speaker. t
have some video to show you of a richard nixon appearing clammy and tired next to a tanned and rested, youthful and fabulous jfk, jr.. this is all relately started to, be more about appearance and, then, actual substance, right? who do you think will prevail, ed? >> i think they both have pretty good style or substance. i don't think either one whip open enough big enough gap. melissa: style, mitt romney, with would be the problem if it came down to style? what would you worry about? >> mitt needs to make it a debate about substance. my worry could be he could get bogged down in details of that substance. if he can't hold the president accountable for how you close 900 dal billion of spending or tax increases, he can not win the debate with enough of a margin to matter. to do that successfully on tv i think is very difficult. melissa: paul, what do you think? >> well i think there is a second element of intrigue here and that is how you're responding as the camera is on you when your opponent is saying bad things about you. melissa: that's a good point. >> all of these clips for the p
america's meant to be. >> and there, there's nixon with the flop sweat. george h.w. bush looking at his watch. appearances count, don't they? >> they really do. and a professional knows that. george h.w. bush in that debate, that third one in richmond in 1992, he was looking at his watch because he was trying to make the point that one of the other candidates had run over time. it didn't really compute this was sending the message that he was impatient, just the kind of message he didn't want to send. >> humor can be an effective tool, diffuse a weakness. >> i will not make age an issue of this campaign. i am not going to exploit for political purposes my opponent's youth and inexperience. >> and at that moment, a lot of people said well, there's the ball game. including his opponent. >> including walter mondale. >> what do you think about humor as a tool in this debate tonight? >> you'd better be a very accomplished actor like reagan or else it probably won't work. in that case, reagan said certain things that might have given rise to further worry he was too old to serve a second term
debates. john kennedy and richard nixon how nixon loft because he didn't wear make up and looked like he didn't shave. they thought he was dark and smarmy. turns out they were right, he was. >> whether was the al gore sigh, over and over again. [ sighs ] >> exactly. before that debate, al gore was five points ahead of george burke, after the sigh, he stalled out and george bush still lost that election, but he closed in close enough for the supreme court to make the call at home plate. but, my favorite, the absolute best debate moment of all lloyd benson, 1988 versus dan quayle. >> i have as much experience in the congress as jack kennedy did when he got the presidency. >> senator i served with jack kennedy. i knew jack kennedy. jack kennedy was a friend of mine. senator, you're no jack kennedy. [ cheers and applause ] >> that was really uncalled for senator. >> you're the one that was making the comparison, senator. >> oh, smack! >> i love that! >> and there's one more. let's keep them on a high note. there's one more not from a general election debate but from a primary just last year
to have you here. >> good morning. >> martha: let's start with the classic, which is the nixon-kennedy debate. and folks who watched it on television clearly thought jack kennedy was the winner, but that wasn't necessarily the response of people who didn't get to see it. >> yeah. there was actually four debates. it was the first presidential debate series. people that listened to it on the radio, which was the majority of radios, thought nixon won on substance. people who watched, thought kennedy did. kennedy was tanned and had make-up on. nixon did not. he came out of the hospital a few days earlier. he was gone. it showed. he sweat a lot and the impression people left with was he was shifty can kennedy was in command. >> martha: he refused make-up apparently, which is probably a candidate made that mistake. let's look at carter-reagan, a fascinating one to watch. we have a little bit of sound from it. we want to get your thoughts on that. let's play that. >> governor reagan, as a matter of fact, gone his political career campaigning around this nation against medicare. >> the
the first kennedy/nixon debate where kennedy defied the expectations that he was a rich light weight playboy and won the debate as much as nixon lost it. in 1980 reagan defies expectations because people -- there was a character that the carter campaign created of him of a nuclear cowboy. it is none of those things. >> carter also was asking about nuclear war. >> what romney has to do is forget the nonsense about it being about himself. if you are a 65-year-old man you are not comfortable in your own skin you never will be. he has to talk to the american people. he has to have a conversation with the american people and get them to see him as a president. >> has he? >> no he has not. >> why not? >> his convention speech he has run a personality campaign and nobody is going to out personality barack obama. >> for romney to just breakthrough what looks like an increasing race in which he has fewer chances to change the dynamics. obama has to just not make it and he wins. this is a tough situation for a challenger particularly on the first debate. the pressure is on domestic policy. and so this
was assigned to conduct the first mission to china. largely because president nixon felt that if he went through regular channels, he would be overwhelmed with a lot of technical details on subjects he considered not up to the immediate challenge, and he could be sure i cannot overwhelm him with details. so when i first came to china, i had an experience which is perhaps unique in this sense -- every visitor to china would have killed for the privilege of meeting chairman mao. i was terrified of having to do it for the reason that i knew that president nixon wanted to be the first policymaker who met mao. i knew my life would not be worth living if i came back having done the first photograph of an american with chairman mao. chairman mao had given instructions that if i requested a meeting with him, i should be taken to him immediately. i went through enormous contortions not to request a meeting. [laughter] and so i achieved that goal of my visit. i've met, of course, each generation of chinese leaders. reflected theaem mission and the conditions of his period. mao was a revolutionary,
f. kennedy and richard nixon squared off in the very first televised debate. while nixon was known for being a fierce debater on camera he looked nervous, sweating profusely under the hot camera lights, whereas kennedy looked calm, cool, collected. forces those that watched the debate, kennedy was the winner, but for those who listened to the debate on radio, they thought nixon won. in the end it was kennedy who won the presidential race. well, of course, humor can also have an affect on the debates. 1908 ronald reagan repeatedly attacked by president jimmy carter for his stance on health care, but reagan won fans with his response. check it out. >> governor reagan, again, typically is against such a proposal. >> governor, there you go again. >> all right. want to bring in presidential historian douglas brinkley. good to see you, as always. let's just start by seeing that moment. how significant was that between carter and reagan? >> oh, it was big. if you go back to 1980, you have jimmy carter, the sitting president, but he had double digit inflation, long gasoline lines, and iran
. largely, because president nixon felt if he went through regular channels, he'd be overwhelmed with a lot of technical details on subjects he considered not central to the immediate challenge, and he could be sure i couldn't overwhelm him with details. [laughter] when i first came to china, i had an experience which is, perhaps unique in this sense -- every visitor to china would have killed for the privilege of meeting chairman mao. i was terrified of having to do it for the reason that i knew that president nixon wanted to be the first policymaker who met him. .. each generation of chinese leader. and each of that reflected the mission and the conditions of experience. now is revolutionary, a prophet consumed by the object is here that recognize no obstacles in terms of eligibility. the standard literalistic language of american diplomacy, he brought me to ina in his mind is that china had to find a possibility of having the barbarians, the more distant barbarians. in other words, how the united states balance the soviet union. that was his strategic objective . the people with great st
. president eisenhower didn't do that, president nixon didn't do that, president reagan made us feel like we were all in it together. >> i've never seen a politician say, i'll take the other part of the vote. i'm not interested in your half, or in this case, 70% he's giving away. >> that's right. i have never heard such language. i think it will allow obama to extend the 47% argument to not only ryan but to the entire republican party. he can say, this is a party that slices and dices the american public. in some ways i think this argument about 30% of the people being lazy, 47% of the people being lazy, goes against the idea of american exceptionalism. how can america be that exceptional if 50% of the country is lazy? we know that's not true. america is an exceptional country. you'll see both romney and ryan struggle with this and have something to answer to tonight on stage and then when ryan takes the stage ultimately next week. but i do think ryan and biden do have something that neither of the principles have. that is, they speak from their gut. they speak from their hearts. and i think
elections, nixon or al gore. what those candidates lost on is likability. how do you take an aggressive tone? how do you go after the president on his record without coming off course? how do you be the likeable guy? >> yeah. well, mitt romney just needs to be mitt romney. i don't think that's a contradiction. but i do think it is somewhat of a tight rope. have you to find the right and proper balance. now, mitt romney went through 19 debates in the primary season. going through that, you know, people said, oh, he had trouble connecting. i didn't buy that at all. he connected better than anybody else. i think he does do that. if mitt's just mitt, he's going to just fine. >> nice to see you, sir. thanks for being with us. >> thanks, soledad. >>> at the top of the hour we'll talk to stephanie cutter, deputy manager for the obama campaign. she'll be joining us. you can watch complete coverage and analysis of the first presidential debate which starts here tonight, 7 p.m. eastern right here on cnn and cnn.com. >>> other stories making news, and john berman has those for us. good morning. >> othe
. >> a history of modern presidential debates. the first one was in 1960, kennedy-nixon. then there was a hiatus until 1976, when gerald ford agreed to debate jimmy carter. the debate commission was established in 1987. jim lehrer, tonight's moderator, has moderated the most debates over those years, 12 altogether. you have gotten criticisms about a moderator 6 -- selection, that they are mainstream media, all white, and middle-age or older. what is the response to that? >> we would state it slightly differently. we would say we have picked four exceptional journalists to have a lot of experience in doing presidential debates and covering politics in the white house and in foreign policy. we think they are also four individuals who have proven it is not about them. we do not want moderator's here trying to put themselves ahead of what the candidates have to say. at the end of the day, the american people want to hear from the candidates. one thing jim lehrer has demonstrated is that he is the type of moderator who lets the candidates do the talking. he will ask the questions, they will be pointe
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